The Mid-Columbia Basin isn’t the only location where the virtual realm of cryptocurrency is colliding with the real world of megawatts and real estate. In places like China, Venezuela and Iceland, cheap land and even cheaper electricity have resulted in bustling mining hubs. But the basin, by dint of its early start, has emerged as one of the biggest boomtowns. By the end of 2018, according to some estimates, miners here could account for anywhere from 15 to 30 percent of all bitcoin mining in the world, and impressive shares of other cryptocurrencies, such as Ethereum and Litecoin. And as with any boomtown, that success has created tensions. There have been disputes between miners and locals, bankruptcies and bribery attempts, lawsuits, even a kind of intensifying guerrilla warfare between local utility crews and a shadowy army of bootleg miners who set up their servers in basements and garages and max out the local electrical grids.
Cryptocurrency mining can be an expensive proposition, requiring computing hardware and electricity. Cryptojacking offers cybercriminals a way to steal computing power from other people to bypass the effort and expense. Cryptojacking software operates on computers in the background, with the only evidence of its presence signified by a user’s device overheating or slowing down.
Keeping your Bitcoin wallet safe is essential as Bitcoin wallets represent high-value targets for hackers. Some safeguards include: encrypting the wallet with a strong password, and choosing the cold storage option i.e. storing it offline. It's also advisable to frequently back up your desktop and mobile wallets, as problems with the wallet software on your computer or mobile device could erase your holdings. 

Bitcoin is the first cryptocurrency, a concept that was discussed in the late 90s. The first Bitcoin specification and proof of concept was published in 2009 in a cryptography mailing list. The concept was presented by a person or group known as Satoshi Nakamoto. The real identity of Nakamoto has been a mystery since that time, with various theories on who the individual or group may be.
Nobody owns the Bitcoin network much like no one owns the technology behind email or the Internet. Bitcoin transactions are verified by Bitcoin miners which has an entire industry and Bitcoin cloud mining options. While developers are improving the software they cannot force a change in the Bitcoin protocol because all users are free to choose what software and version they use.

Shipping containers make for a quick way to set up an industrial bitcoin mining operation, but the servers inside produce so much heat that large fans are needed to move incredible volumes of air at high velocity in order to keep them overheating. At top, workers have attached ducts to the hot exhaust, carrying it over to melt the frozen worksite and warm their lounge area. | Patrick Cavan Brown for Politico Magazine
Bitcoin Miner 1.54.0 - Fix several edgehtml.dll related crashes. Bitcoin Miner 1.53.0 - Fix connection issues with the default mining pool. - Fix potential UI update issue when mining is stopped. Bitcoin Miner 1.48.0 - Temporarily revoke the webcam permission to workaround a Microsoft Advertising camera issue, unfortunately this also disables Payout Address QR code scanning. - Reduce number of mining errors through improved Stratum difficulty handling. Bitcoin Miner 1.47.0 - Increase Satoshi yield estimate display to 4 decimal places when mining. - Rename Accepted and Rejected share count displays to Shares and Errors. - Minor mining performance improvements. Bitcoin Miner 1.39.0 - Next payout date is now shown when default pool payout requirements are met.
Video description: Bitcoin.com’s mining services continue to grow exponentially as pool.bitcoin.com commands roughly 3 percent of the Bitcoin network’s global mining power. In addition to the company’s mining capabilities, Bitcoin.com is partnered with the largest U.S.-based bitcoin mining data center allowing the company to leverage mining services like no other business in the industry.
Network nodes can validate transactions, add them to their copy of the ledger, and then broadcast these ledger additions to other nodes. To achieve independent verification of the chain of ownership each network node stores its own copy of the blockchain.[65] About every 10 minutes, a new group of accepted transactions, called a block, is created, added to the blockchain, and quickly published to all nodes, without requiring central oversight. This allows bitcoin software to determine when a particular bitcoin was spent, which is needed to prevent double-spending. A conventional ledger records the transfers of actual bills or promissory notes that exist apart from it, but the blockchain is the only place that bitcoins can be said to exist in the form of unspent outputs of transactions.[3]:ch. 5
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