The trick, though, was finding a location where you could put all that cheap power to work. You needed an existing building, because in those days, when bitcoin was trading for just a few dollars, no one could afford to build something new. You needed space for a few hundred high-speed computer servers, and also for the heavy-duty cooling system to keep them from melting down as they churned out the trillions of calculations necessary to mine bitcoin. Above all, you needed a location that could handle a lot of electricity—a quarter of a megawatt, maybe, or even a half a megawatt, enough to light up a couple hundred homes.


Eventually, you will want to access the Bitcoins or Litecoins stored on it. If you have the first version of OpenDime, you will need to break off a plastic "tongue" in the middle of the flash stick. Later versions work much like resetting old routers. You will need to push a pin through a marked section of the drive. Both of these processes physically change the drive. After doing this the private key associated with that OpenDime will be downloaded onto your pc or mobile device. This is the most vulnerable point in using the OpenDime. Make sure that you are using a secured system when doing this. You can then use the private key to access your funds in the same way you would with any other platform.

Transactions are verified by network nodes through cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain. Bitcoin was invented by an unknown person or group of people using the name Satoshi Nakamoto[9] and released as open-source software in 2009.[10] Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies,[11] products, and services. Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimates that in 2017, there were 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin.[12]
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